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Jim Asks: Where can I search for legal terms?

Andy Sez: Jim, my first suggestion is to stop looking at food sites. That seems like a pretty obvious dead-end to me.

Ummm, seeing as how this is, in fact, a food site, or maybe a füd site as the name would imply, and I am a food site advice giver not a legal advice giver, I'm probably not the first one you should be asking. But since you have, I'll make some suggestions. Did it ever occur to you, in all of your web browsing, to seach under the keywords "legal terms"? Or maybe you should try the library of your local law school? Or maybe call that old friend of yours who's suffering through law school? Call the civics teacher at your local high school. Call the law offices of Dewey, Cheatem and Howe. Watch the Paradigm Case, The Paper Chase or To Kill a Mockingbird. Instead of looking at The Füd Court, look for some legal books on Amazon or Alibris.

If none of these are helpful, for a fee I can ask my father the lawyer and we can go from there.

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Karen Asks: What is the difference in a marinara sauce vs. a spaghetti sauce?

Andy Sez: The difference is that all marinara sauce is spaghetti sauce though not all spaghetti sauce is marinara sauce. Draw a big circle and label it "spaghetti sauce". Inside that one draw a smaller circle and label that one "marinara sauce". There you have it. Except that isn't really true. Because if you put your marinara sauce over meat or any other dish it's no longer spaghetti sauce, it's just marinara sauce. And if you put it over ziti, it's ziti sauce.

Basically, spaghetti sauce is any sauce that you put on your spaghetti. Marinara sauce on the other hand is an Italian tomato sauce flavored with onion, garlic and oregano. It can, however, be used as Spaghetti sauce.

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Sarah Ann Asks: What is your ruling? Can Corn Chowder be considered an appetizer if you are playing a game where you have to name an appetizer?.

Andy Sez: Dear Sarah,

When looking at a restaurant menu, where is soup usually listed? That's right: in the appetizer section. Of course, you should feel free to eat corn chowder as an entree, but you may want to supplement it with a salad and some crusty bread or something. But I think you can claim your points with corn chowder as an app. It may have made more sense to go with something less controversial such as crab cakes (double points for the double c?), clams casino (again, the double c), or caesar salad. But in my book corn chowder counts.

The real question is: What game were you laying...and why?

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Licia Asks: How do you pronounce gruyere? I have heard different ways.

Andy Sez: How I love questions about cheese...and how I love Gruyere -- no matter how you pronounce it.

I've always pronounced it groo-YEHR and nobody has ever looked at me funny for doing so. Of course, if you ask me to pronounce it while I have a mouthful of cheese, it might come out a bit different. And I might spit little chewed up pieces of Gruyere on you which we'd all like to avoid. The Food Lover's Companion says that an acceptable pronunciation may also be gree-YEHR, though I've never heard it said like that.

Just make sure that the Gruyere, whether it be Gruyere of Greeyere, is good Gruyere and not a bad, waxy knock-off. It should be dense, nutty, fruity, and a bit sweet...and very, very delicious. If you're looking for a change, try Comte, sometimes called Gruyere de Comte, a similar cheese made on the French side of the Alps.

With all that said, I'm on my way to Zingerman's where I will procure not only some antique Gruyere but maybe some Appenzeller as well.

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Wendy Asks: Could you please tell me how to pronounce the word worcestershire, it has become a debating point within the family. Thank you for your help.

Andy Sez: Your family can now move on to debating more important things like the dismal state of our national economy or the dismal state of affairs in Iraq because I will now put an end to the worcestershire debate.

WOOS-tur-shur.

I know it doesn't look like it should be pronounced that way, but it is. Much like the lovely British cheese Gloucester is pronounced GLAU-ster, that middle "ce" is part of the previous syllable and not one unto itself.

Now go make some Bloody Marys and make up with the family.

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Sarah Asks: Where do pierogi come from?

Andy Sez: When I was little, pierogi came from the Polish booth at the annual Ann Arbor Ethnic Food Festival. Later, when I was enamored with frozen foods, they seemed to magically appear in the freezer at home. I now know that my mother actually bought them at the grocery store and put them in the freezer. When I moved to San Francisco, and was frequently too lazy to cook for myself, I continued on the frozen food path but, as my mother was thousands of miles away, I had to find them on my own. Those pierogi came from the Trader Joe's on 9th and Brannan.

If, however, you're really asking where the humble pierogi originates, then I suppose the answer you're looking for is Poland.

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Tim Asks: What fruits start with the letters: E I J Q U V X Y Z?

Andy Sez: I can't believe this is actually a serious question, but since I find myself with some time on my hands and as I always like a challenge, here goes:

E: Elderberry
As in "Your mother was a hamster and your father smelt of elderberries" from Monty Python's Holy Grail.

I: Italian Eggplant
Technically a fruit, this small variety is more delicate than the bigger ones.

J: Jackfruit
Available canned in the U.S., you'll most likely have to go to South American, Africa or southeast Asia to get fresh ones.

Q: Quince
Rarely eaten raw, the floral, aromatic qualities of quince really only come out when you cook them. Frequently cooked down with sugar, spices, and vanilla into a jelly called Membrillo, it is a traditional pairing with Manchego cheese. Funny how all things lead to cheese.

U: Ugli Fruit
Thought to be a hybrid of tangerines and grapefruits, these aren't all that ugly. Why do we have to be so shallow anyway. Can't we ever see past appearances and appreciate inner beauty?

V: Viognier Grapes
A member of the vinifera family, this is one of the main grapes of France's Rhone Valley. It's the grape that convinced me I actually did like white wine.

X: You've got me. I'll keep on looking.

Z: Zucchini
Again, technically a fruit. Not an exciting answer, I know, but an answer just the same.

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Jim Asks: Where can I search for legal terms?

Andy Sez: Jim, my first suggestion is to stop looking at food sites. That seems like a pretty obvious dead-end to me.

Ummm, seeing that this is, in fact, a food site, or maybe a füd site as the name would imply, and I am a food site advice giver and not a legal advice giver, I'm probably not the first one you should be asking. But since you have, I'll make some suggestions. Did it ever occur to you, in all of your web browsing, to seach under the keywords "legal terms"? Or maybe you should try the library of your local law school? Or maybe call that old friend of yours who's suffering through law school. Call the civics teacher at your local high school. Call the law offices of Dewey, Cheatem and Howe. Watch the Paradigm Case, The Paper Chase or To Kill a Mockingbird. Instead of looking on Füd Court, look for some legal books on Amazon or Alibris.

If none of these are helpful, for a fee I can ask my father the lawyer and we can go from there.

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Linda Asks: How do you make a rootbeer float with liquor. And it tastes just like a rootbeer float?

Andy Sez: This sounds slightly suspicious....I mean, if you're making cocktails, does it have to taste "exactly" like a non-alcholic root beer float? Or is what's really going on here that you're trying to slip somebody a little something-something that they might not be expecting. This raises a whole mess of ethical and legal questions that I'm not sure the Fud Court, regardless of its judgments and proceedings, is ready to address. However, giving you the benefit of the doubt, I'd say that if you want to give your root beer float a little zing, add some root beer schnapps and Galliano to the regular mix. This will make it an alcoholic beverage, though I can't really say an adult one. And, if in fact you are trying to slip someone a mickey, there's a much better chance that the sugar will make them sick long before the liquor does.

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Lisa Asks: When cooking garlic chicken with lemon juice do you have to use fresh lemon or can you use jif lemon just the same?

Andy Sez: Lisa, The question here isn't can you but should you. It's your chicken and you can do whatever you want with it.

Before I answer your question let's take a little test. Go to your kitchen and get a real lemon and a bottle (or whatever) your commerical brand comes in. Taste them both. Notice a difference? I thought so.

I have never tasted a bottled brand of lemon juice that tastes either very good or much like fresh lemon juice. The stuff that comes in the little plastic lemon tastes very much the way I'd imagine juice from a plastic lemon would taste.

The flavors of whatever you put into your recipes will be reflected in the finished product so use that as a guide. If you like the flavor of the bottled stuff, you might like it in the dish. I don't, so I wouldn't use it. From a techical perspective, it will work but I certainly wouldn't put it on the table. I'll use frozen peas and I'll use canned tomatoes but bottled lemon juice? Never. Lemons are cheap and they last for a while in the fridge so do yourself and everybody else a favor and buy real lemons. They look better, smell better and certainly taste better.

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See the Ask Andy Archive for even more probing questions, such as:

> How do you brine a piece of meat?
> What's the history of buffalo wings?
> What's up with the durian?
> What's the difference between a caiparinha and a mojito?
> What is a Pippic?

> How to make burger in the electrical oven, in house?

> How do you dice onions?

Ask Andy a Question

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